Eurasian Journal of Educational Research

Print ISSN: 1302-597X & e-ISSN: 2528-8911
Suleyman GOKSOY
Analysis of the Relationship between Shared Leadership and Distributed Leadership
10.14689/ejer.2016.65.17

Problem Statement: The current study‘s purpose is: First, to examine the relationship between shared leadership and distributed leadership, which, despite having many similar aspects in theory and practice, are defined as separate concepts. Second, to compare the two approaches and dissipate the theoretical contradictions. In this sense, the main aim of the study is to examine administrators‘ shared leadership and distributed leadership levels, the relationships between shared leadership and distributed leadership, and the predictive power of shared leadership over distributed leadership.
Purpose of Study: The aim of the study is to examine, compare, and remove the specified conceptual contradictions between the distributed leadership and shared leadership, many similar aspects of which are highlighted despite their different nominations. Method: The study utilized a relational survey model and causal design to examine the relationship between shared leadership and distributed leadership and the predictive power of shared leadership over distributed leadership. In the current study, shared leadership and its sub dimensions were regarded as the independent variable, whereas distributed leadership was used as the dependent variable in the context of causal research design.
Findings and Results: The findings of the study show that according to participant views, administrators have high levels of shared leadership and distributed leadership; however, the levels are not very high. Based on the perception of participants, there is a positive, medium-level, and significant relationship between the Shared Leadership Scale and the Distributed Leadership Scale. Therefore, we can argue that there is a relationship between shared leadership and distributed leadership, but this relationship is not very distinctive. It is observed that all these leadership concepts are close to one another in meaning and can be used interchangeably. The results of this study suggest using the term "collective leadership" instead to bridge the gap between distributed leadership and shared leadership and prevent cognitive complexity. According to participant views, administrators have high levels of shared leadership and distributed leadership; however, the levels are not very high. There is a relationship between shared leadership and distributed leadership, but this relationship is not very distinctive.
Recommendations: Therefore, it can be argued that shared leadership and distributed leadership approaches are separate leadership approaches and that it is not suitable to use them interchangeably, although they share many common points.

Keywords: Leadership, distributed leadership, shared leadership

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2016 Issue 65

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